Home Awareness 6 Reasons Misophonia Isn’t Chewing Rage

6 Reasons Misophonia Isn’t Chewing Rage

For those that don’t know, Misophonia is (most-likely) a neurologically based disorder that causes an aversive reaction to audial and visual stimuli, and it’s not chewing rage. In laymen’s terms this means that noises like tapping, whistling, crunching and chewing can cause a fight/flight/freeze reaction. There is no cure or treatment. Sometimes the press represents us as angry people that are upset by chewing. This may be true for some of us but it’s not the entire story…

 

1. Misophonia sufferers have visual triggers too.

It’s not just sounds that cause an aversive, rage-induced reaction. Many of us suffer the same fight/flight/freeze from visual stimuli. This can include tapping, swaying, and other movements/sights.

 

2. The term “chewing rage” is offensive.

Instead of talking about the inability of persons with Misophonia to filter out audial and visual stimuli, the term “chewing rage” makes a mockery of our disorder. In a world of stigma- this merely adds to the problem.

 

3. Saying “chewing rage” makes the chewing sound like the problem.

We need to stop blaming the trigger for the disorder. Since different persons have different triggers we need to focus on the brain, and not the person making the “offending” noise.

 

4. “Chewing rage” is too negative.

We don’t hate sounds, we are merely experiencing an inability to filter them out, and “habituate”. The anger comes from our discomfort, but it is not the entire problem.

 

5. Many sufferers of Misophonia experience a myriad of triggers, not just “chewing rage”.

These can range from chewing, tapping, breathing, and snoring to more obscure sounds. Not all persons are triggered by the same. For example, one person may be triggered by chewing and another may love going out to eat with friends.

 

6. Terms like “chewing rage” cheapen our suffering.

We need to stop labeling disorders with silly names. Misophonia is not merely a rage disorder. We are people that are suffering from a brain condition.

 

Does chewing bother you? You may have a newly recognized neurological condition, called Misophonia. This condition has been called a few other things. I’m not going to list them all. Mostly because there’s not enough press, science, or research to back them up. However, “chewing rage” and “sound rage” are some of the most interesting. A lot of people have asked me, “why does chewing bother me?” I wish the answer was simple. Perhaps, one day, our researchers will be able to answer this in greater detail. For now, I can tell you that you are certainly not alone in this phenomenon. The literature review on misophonia shows the direction for research and explains the research already done on the disorder. You can read more here.

Share this with people who keep calling misophonia “chewing rage” and let’s change the conversation!

Want to learn more? Join a Workshop with Dr. Jennifer Brout or Duke CMER at Misophonia Education.