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Getting Stuff Done With Misophonia

by Shaylynn H.

Let’s face it – misophonia throws us a curve ball. Every single time that we’re faced with a trigger situation, our current path is set off course and we have to readjust. Getting stuff done is hard! Depending on your severity, you may already be choosing jobs and lifestyle changes that accommodate for the time-sucker that misophonia can be. I’m not going to lie, my advice won’t be perfect. I’m actually nocturnal because of my misophonia. It’s just too much to be awake during the day whilst lawnmowers buzz, cars blast by, and any other foreseeable interaction. Here are some tips on how I still get things done, despite misophonia.

Getting stuff done is hard! Getting stuff done with misophonia, is a nightmare!

1. Allow yourself the time to recover

Take breaks when you have to. It’s not a sign of weakness to need time to calm down. Explain to your supervisors, and have a doctor write a note to back you up. Here is a sample accommodation letter.

2. Have conversations with those triggering you, whilst not triggered, in a polite manner

Explain the disorder to them so that they might be more accommodating when the situation arises.

3. Don’t expect miracles

We’re all going to have times, situations, or events that are more triggering than others. Plan for them. If you have to pick up groceries, do so at a time when there are less people there. You could even call the store and ask them their hours, or you could get proactive – sign up for a delivery service if it’s available in your area. Find ways to rearrange tasks so that the time you’re triggered is minimal, and then you can recover better in the few times you are triggered.

4. Plan to change plans

It’s okay to change plans! Really. It’s okay if you’re not able to do something and you need to reschedule. Learn to take care of yourself first. You are the champion of your body and health. Only you can know what you can handle.

5. Have anti-stress activities that won’t trigger you

Sometimes the key to getting things done is to be less stressed overall. Have at least 1-2 activities that you engage in regularly (that do not trigger you) so that you have planned downtime that you know will be relaxing, and completely without stimuli. Knowing this time is available will make the triggers seem temporary.

6. Cram what you can into your “good hours” and don’t stress the “bad ones”

During the night, when there are no people around, that’s when I do whatever I can get done. There are always undoubtedly things that get pushed. I learn to live with it. I do the things I absolutely have to, and then the ones that I can if there’s extra time.

Thanks for reading! I hope these tips helped you.

 

Want to learn more? Join a Workshop with Dr. Jennifer Brout or Duke CMER at Misophonia Education.