Personal Experience: Exposure Therapy Doesn’t Work

I used the free exposure therapy app at the urging of my psych and therapist who are convinced that the only way for me to learn to tolerate sounds is to listen to triggers, gradually increasing the volume and frequency.

I did not find it helpful. It agitates me, it does not in any way increase tolerance. They (and I) both read Tom Dozier’s book – the guy who made the trigger apps, and wants to change the name of misophonia.

He isn’t advocating for typical exposure therapy, but my psych and therapist think he is and both tried to throw me into a group therapy of about 15 people. This was WAY too much exposure at once. I have misokinesia too, and I sat there, earplugs in, trying not to look at anyone, basically in a flight rage panic attack for the first hour and then fled.

I am on disability, as over the years my misophonia has worsened, as well I have a number of other disorders. The only relief I have from misophonia is being able to control my environment at home, with the aid of earplugs and noise cxling headphones.

Exposure therapy (any kind that I know of)is hopeless. I worked with misophonia for many years, and the erance does not increase with exposure, you just learn to internalize your rage responses, or plan escapes from group meetings etc.

I had to drop out of college because of misophonia (and other disorders), but misophonia was the primary cause. Earplugs didn’t help in that setting.

Submitted by Jane

Editor note: Here are some resources on treatment (there is none, currently), research, and a pamphlet for explaining misophonia to your doctor. 

 

What is the Best Misophonia Treatment?

 

Misophonia Coping Tips

 

Misophonia For Doctors: Information Packet

 

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